09
May 17

Presentation of the LL Journal, Vol. 12, No. 1

The PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages

invites you to attend

The Presentation of the LL Journal, Vol. 12, No. 1

Join the HLBLL community in celebration of the launch of another issue of the LL Journal and the hard work of its editors and all its contributors! Volume 12, Number 1 will go live on Friday, May 12 at 6:30pm.

The LL Journal is a multi-disciplinary, open-access, electronic journal dedicated to the investigation of various realms of Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian studies including literature, language, and culture. A collaboration of HLBLL’s students as editors, readers, and designers, the Journal has contributors from all over the world and invites us all to engage in reflection and discussion. The LL Journal is hosted on the CUNY Academic Commons. Previous issues of the Journal, dating back to 2006, can be found on their site.

Flyer, LL Journal Presentation on May 12

The Journal’s presentation will be followed by an end-of-the-semester reception.

This event is free and open to the public.


21
Mar 17

The HLBLL Instagram Rotation Curation Experiment

When I created an Instagram account in 2015 for the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages, I admit, I didn’t really know what I was doing. Instagram was a fairly unknown platform for me, despite its wide use among Millenials and in our program. Being so different than the two social media platforms we were already using in the program—Facebook and Twitter—proceeding in much the same way as on those was not practical or yielding results, although I tried.

In a nutshell, Instagram is a photo-sharing application for mobile devices, and because it has maintained this identity throughout its growth, Instagram has purposeful limitations that make it a less-than-ideal platform for the announcing of upcoming events, calls for papers, directing users to more information, pre-scheduling posts, etc. In short, the social media strategy applied to our Facebook and Twitter accounts was not an effective Instagram strategy. And the account sat, mostly unused, for many months of the year.

Several weeks ago, I joined Instagram myself, partially because I wanted an outlet for the pictures I like to take while running in the city and partially because a friend of mine adopted a puppy and shared adorable puppy photos on Instagram daily. And also partially because I thought that through using the platform personally, I’d be more prepared to tackle it as a Social Media Fellow. After several weeks of personal Instagram use and browsing through the often quotidian, often captivating photos of others with their witty hashtags, I was struck with an idea. Actually, the idea is not mine, but I remembered that the Twitter account, @sweden, has a new Swede Tweeter every week. I thought this model, called Rotation Curation, would be particularly interesting, novel, and a more fruitful use of the program’s Instagram account.

The intention of Rotation Curation on Instagram is to use the platform not so much as an account broadcasting news and upcoming events from our program, but rather keeping in line with its strengths showcasing spontaneously captured photos rather than planned images and information. The first Rotation Curation post on our account is mine: an adorable minor frustration during my dissertation writing.

As the curation of the program’s Instagram account moves throughout the members of the HLBLL community, we will have glimpses into the lives of students from the first year to their last, taking classes, preparing for exams, teaching on various CUNY campuses, writing dissertations, organizing and attending events, looking up in awe at the Midtown skyline.

On Instagram, the everyday moments, such as a weekly class…

Leyendo #LaCautiva #Thesisroom #FernandoDegiovanniVol.2 #Classes #PhDLife #Food #tortilladepatatas

A post shared by HLBLL at The CUNY Grad Center (@gradcenter.hlbll) on

…are given as much weight as a lecture in our spring Colloquia Series.

Today, María Fernanda Garbero is giving a talk about #madresplazademayo #conferencia #Argentina #rotationcuration #Photobyelenaoekatherina

A post shared by HLBLL at The CUNY Grad Center (@gradcenter.hlbll) on

 

We are now beginning our third week of this Rotation Curation experiment. New curators announce their guardianship of the account in its profile and I have encouraged each one to invent their own hashtag signature for their posts.

#speak #art #hallway #GC #CUNY #Monday #Photobyrocos_life #rotationcuration

A post shared by HLBLL at The CUNY Grad Center (@gradcenter.hlbll) on

And so I invite you to follow the HLBLL Instagram account and check out all that this Rotation Curation experiment has to offer.

Prospective Students! It’s a window into our program!
Graduate Center community! We’re having fun and working hard!
HLBLL PhD Candidates! Feel nostalgia for first exam preparation!
HLBLL Level 1 Students! Your dissertation-writing colleagues are scarcely seen but churning out the pages!


HLBLL students, future Instagram curators of all PhD levels are wanted for weeks starting April 10th. No personal Instagram account is required: just a willingness to download the app on your smartphone. If you are interested, send me a message: jprince[at]gradcenter[dot]cuny[dot]edu.


13
Mar 17

Event Rescheduled: “Madres de Plaza de Mayo: 40 años de vida y memoria”

***Please note: Due to the school closures on Tuesday, March 14th, this event is now rescheduled for Wednesday, March 15th.***

———————————————————————————————————

The PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages

invites you to attend

“Madres de Plaza de Mayo: 40 años de vida y memoria”

a lecture by
Maria Fernanda Garbero (Universidad Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro / Centro de Memoria de las Madres, Buenos Aires)

The event will take place in room 4116 at 6:30pm on Wednesday, March 15th.

This event is free and open to the public.


26
Feb 17

Call for Papers: LL Journal’s Vol. 12, No. 1

Updated! The editors of the LL Journal have extended the deadline for submissions to March 25, 2017!

The LL Journal is a publication of the students of the Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages PhD program at the Graduate Center, CUNY. Find out more about the LL Journal and browse their most recent issue (Vol. 11, No. 2) and archives on their Commons site.

 

Recibimos trabajos originales en español, inglés o portugués, sobre literatura, estudios culturales, visuales y de género, lingüística teórica y sociolingüística que se relacionen con los mundos hispanos y luso-brasileños.

Envíos a lljournal[dot]cuny[at]gmail[dot]com.

And be sure to check out the LL Journal on Facebook and Twitter!


19
Dec 16

The HLBLL Holiday Gift Guide

Looking for the perfect last-minute gift for your friends or your family? This season, choose from one of three new publications featuring the outstanding scholarship and hard work of the HLBLL community, and give them the gift of erudition.

LL Journal's Editorial Illustration by Belén Paredes.

LL Journal’s Editorial Illustration by Belén Paredes.

What: The LL Journal (Volume 11, Number 2)

The details: The LL Journal is a publication of the students of the PhD program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages featuring scholarly articles, interviews, and reviews from the realms of Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian studies on topics ranging from applied linguistics to literature to the visual arts. Recently, the LL Journal has included a section devoted to original creative works.

This issue of the LL Journal includes the work of three HLBLL students: Lorena Paz López published a review of Museo del consumo. Archivos de la cultura de masas en Argentina by Graciela Montaldo; Natalia Castro’s review of Space and the Memories of Violence. Landscapes of Erasure, Disappearance and Exception edited by Estela Schindel and Pamela Colombo is also available; and Ernesto Cuba logs an interview with Mariel Acosta titled “Agitando lo cotidiano. Una conversación sobre el desafío Ⓐnarquista frente al sexismo en el lenguaje.”

The best part? The LL Journal is completely open access, meaning that its excellent scholarship is available for free!

 

screen-shot-2016-12-10-at-10-11-26-pmWhat: Dramatized Societies: Quality Television in Spain and Mexico, by Paul Julian Smith

The details: HLBLL’s distinguished professor and prolific scholar, Dr. Paul Julian Smith, studies television series from the past decade–from Spain’s Física o química to Mexico’s XY–as a lens for understanding the two countries’ national narratives.

Now available: Dramatized Societies is available in hard cover from Oxford University Press (US) or Liverpool University Press (UK).

Filosofia y culturas hispanicasWhatFilosofía y culturas hispánicas: nuevas perspectivas, edited by Nuria Morgado and Rolando Pérez.

The details: This new book is not only edited by two Graduate Center professors (Nuria Morgado, College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center; Rolando Pérez, Hunter College and the Graduate Center), but the publication also contains chapters by several others from the Graduate Center community:

Professor Linda Martín Alcoff (Philosophy, Women’s Studies; Hunter College and the Graduate Center)
Professor William Childers (Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center)
Professor Silvia Dapía (John Jay College and the Graduate Center
HLBLL alumnus Dr. Adrián Izquierdo (Hunter College)
HLBLL alumnus Dr. José Antonio Losada-Montero (Southwest Minnesota State University)
our most recent HLBLL alumna–who defended her dissertation last month!–Dr. Laura Sández
HLBLL alumnus Dr. Marcos Wasem (Purdue University)
and Professor Oswaldo Zavala (College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center)

Now available: Filosofía y culturas hispánicas: nuevas perspectivas was published last month and is now available on Amazon.


03
Nov 16

CFP: 22nd Annual HLBLL Graduate Student Conference

Over the Wall/Saltar el muro:
Compromiso público y academia/Public Engagement & Academia

The PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso Brazilian Literatures and Languages

invites abstract submissions for its

XXII Annual Graduate Student Conference

Conference Dates: April 27-28, 2017.
Keynote Speakers: Lydia Otero (University of Arizona) and Ariana Mangual Figueroa (Rutgers University)

Deadline for Abstracts: January 15, 2017

cfp-22nd-congreso

The information below has been provided by the organizing committee of the 22nd Annual HLBLL Graduate Student Conference.

Over the Wall/Saltar el muro:
Compromiso público y academia/Public Engagement & Academia

In current debates, the idea of a wall becomes a point of discussion from which to explore the relationship between public engagement and academia. Are the walls that separate intellectual, linguistic, artistic, social, and political practices insurmountable? What other metaphors of the wall speak to us? How do we imagine these metaphors and what forms do they take? Who constructs them and who challenges them? When are they useful and when are they not? How do we cross them?

This conference proposes to jump over, perforate, cross, and tear down walls. It invites us to transgress academic hermeticism in order to overcome isolation and promote reflection on intellectual work, its social dimension and its relationship with the public. Through original investigations, we hope to discuss limits and their forms, whether they be self-imposed or constructed, and strategies to overcome these limits.

In order to approach these issues, we seek to reflect on the following themes, without limiting ourselves to them:

  • Language of the wall and walls of language
  • Points of departure for outlining walls
  • Public engagement or “just another brick in the wall”
  • Glotopolitics and other sociolinguistic challenges
  • Contemporary language mapping
  • Multilinguism and the preservation of languages
  • Translation, demolitions and acculturations
  • Identity, immigration and culture
  • lntertextuality/intermediality/interdisciplinarity
  • Walls and coloniality
  • Gender/Género/Genre walls
  • Bodies and walls
  • Jumping over walls in performing practices
  • Social networks: the virtual wall
  • Walls and urban practices

The doctoral students of the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York invite you to submit abstracts (250 words) to congreso.hlbll.cuny@gmail.com before 01/15/2017. In the body of the email, please include your name, contact information, academic affiliation and any needed audiovisual equipment. Your presentations are limited to a maximum of 20 minutes and can be presented in Spanish, English or Portuguese.


24
Sep 16

Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricas

In the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso Brazilian Literatures and Languages at the Graduate Center, our intellectual community is enhanced by the academic events organized by our students. Besides the annual graduate student conference (coming up on its 22nd year!), each year HLBLL students have also organized readings, lectures, screenings, and discussions on a wide variety of topics and with exciting guests.

One such event is the upcoming two-part series, Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricas: Hablan las narradoras, which invites four distinguished women writers–Sylvia Molloy, Lina Meruane, Achy Obejas, and Valeria Luiselli–to enter into conversation with each other and the public about such possible topics as the experience of translation as a cultural exchange in New York, the relation between English and Spanish in both their academic and creative writing careers, the importance of emerging LGBTIQ voices in fiction, the immigrant women’s experience in the U.S., and issues related to women writer’s rights. The series was organized by HLBLL students Elena Chávez Goycochea, Mariana Romo-Carmona, and Nan Zheng.

Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricas: Hablan las narradoras

Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricasFriday, September 30: A conversation with Sylvia Molloy y Lina Meruane

Friday, November 4: A conversation with Achy Obejas & Valeria Luiselli

 

Both conversations are free, open to the public, and will take place starting at 6:30pm in room 4116 at the Graduate Center, CUNY. A reception will follow the conversation on each night.

Thanks to our fantastic student organizers, and also to the event’s co-sponsors:
The PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages
The students of the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages
The Doctoral Students’ Council
The Classical and Modern Languages department at City College, CUNY
The Feminist Press
The Mexican Cultural Institute of New York
The Center for the Study of Women & Society


18
Sep 16

CFP: LL Journal’s Volume 11, Number 2

Call for Papers: LL Journal’s Volume 11, Number 2

Deadline for submission: October 3, 2016

The LL Journal is a publication of the students of the Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages PhD program at the Graduate Center, CUNY. Find out more about the LL Journal and browse their most recent issue (Vol. 11, No. 1) and archives on their Commons site.

ll-journal-fall-16-cfp

 

LL Journal recibe trabajos originales, escritos en español, inglés o portugués, sobre literatura, estudios culturales, visuales y de género, lingüística teórica y sociolingüística, que se relacionen con los mundos hispanos y luso-brasileños.

Para nuestra sección temática recibimos artículos, piezas de creación (narrativa y poesía), entrevistas y reseñas bajo el lema: “¿Post?nación: identidades, fracturas y desplazamientos.”

Todos los trabajos deberán respetar las orientaciones propuestas en las Directrices para autores y se enviarán al siguiente correo electrónico: lljournal [dot] cuny [at] gmail [dot] com.

Para mantener el anonimato durante el proceso de selección, se requiere indicar los datos personales en el cuerpo del correo electrónico y no en el archivo adjunto que contiene el artículo. Los autores seleccionados serán notificados en un plazo no mayor a dos meses.

LL Journal es una publicación coordinada por las y los estudiantes del Programa Doctoral de Lenguas y Literaturas Hispánicas y Luso-Brasileñas. CUNY, The Graduate Center, Nueva York.


23
Aug 16

SSOFT: The Linguist’s Kitchen

This is the final HLBLL blog feature in Summer Series on Fall Teaching (SSOFT). We hope that our brief writeups and links to resources in the CUNY world and beyond have helped you prepare for the upcoming semester of teaching in CUNY.

This week, SSOFT features The Linguist’s Kitchen.

Past SSOFT features:

Open Educational Resources
The Graduate Center’s Teaching and Learning Center
Free course sites and Social Paper: OpenCUNY, The CUNY Academic Commons, and Social Paper
Resource Repositories: CUNY Syllabus Project, CUNY Academic Works

The Linguist’s Kitchen

Ian Phillips, PhD candidate in Linguistics at the Graduate Center, developed The Linguist’s Kitchen with the support of the New Media Lab and a Provost’s Digital Innovation Grant. The application will be launched shortly. Ahead of its launch, creator Ian Phillips shared a bit about how The Linguist’s Kitchen came to be and how CUNY instructors and students might use it in the classroom. Read our interview below.

 

The Linguist's KitchenThe site is called “The Linguist’s Kitchen.” So what does it mean to “cook” data?

If you go out there and collect linguistic data in the world, that’s a bit messy, you need to clean it up. So the idea is that [using The Linguist’s Kitchen] you can cook it up, clean it up. In linguistics, cooked data will allow you to learn something, come to a generalization.

Could you tell me a bit about how you came up with the idea for the Linguist’s Kitchen? Why do you think it’s a helpful application?

At the time I was in the ITP [Instructional Technology and Pedagogy certificate] program and also teaching a course at City College called Languages and Dialects in Cross-Cultural Perspective. I was teaching this course and most of the students had never thought about language as a system, something that could be analyzed for something other than meaning. One of the important parts of the course is talking about syntax and how all languages have syntax. But we didn’t get really deep because it was introductory. We talked about syntactic constituents and identified phrase structure rules. And the students had a hard time with that because there are so many ways to analyze a sentence.

The other part of it, I had 41 students in that class and there were something like 29 different languages spoken by students in the class. So we talked about how what makes a dialect different than a “standard” language is perception. “Standard” languages are spoken by people in power. And homework examples [for this class] would focus on dominant, standard languages, but you wouldn’t do a lot of work analyzing those other languages that students spoke and most of the students who spoke non-standard language varieties (of English or Spanish mostly) also didn’t have a high opinion of their own language. They viewed these languages as “broken” or “incorrect.”

So the idea was, since all languages have rules, why can’t we analyze their own language practices. That was the motivation [for this site], and maybe it will help student engagement because they are analyzing their own languages. They are the experts.

How do you expect to see The Linguist’s Kitchen being used in classrooms?

Test groups thought that even just a portion of this site, like identifying parts of speech of a sentence, would be great for some classes. A recurring theme is that it would be good to use in conjunction with classroom instruction. It’s not quite at the point where the students can just go at it alone.

It can be used for students to analyze their own languages, but a good starting point would be to have instructors give students lists of sentences to be analyzed that they know would work out well.

This interface also would be good to analyze sentences where there is code switching, which a lot of students are interested in.

It could also be used for any course where you’re teaching anything about language learning. Sometimes students come in and don’t know the parts of speech.

I’d like to emphasize that this was an experiment in pedagogy, and I really just wanted to see if this could improve teaching and learning in the classroom.

—–

As tips for use of The Linguist’s Kitchen in your classroom, Ian also adds that while the end goal is to have instructor and student roles, and possibly even a researcher interface, at this point the site will be most beneficial for student learning if paired with classroom instruction and if students are given curated sentences to “cook.”

If you choose to use The Linguist’s Kitchen in your classroom this fall, Ian appreciates feedback on how you and your students use the site, and on any bugs you find.


15
Aug 16

Summer Series on Fall Teaching: Open Educational Resources (OER)

Each Monday until the beginning of the school year, the HLBLL blog will feature a Summer Series on Fall Teaching (SSOFT), with brief writeups and links to resources in the CUNY world and beyond to help you prepare for the upcoming semester of teaching in CUNY.

This week, SSOFT features Open Educational Resources (OER).

Past SSOFT features:
The Graduate Center’s Teaching and Learning Center
Free course sites and Social Paper: OpenCUNY, The CUNY Academic Commons, and Social Paper
Resource Repositories: CUNY Syllabus Project, CUNY Academic Works

Open Educational Resources (OER)

Open Educational Resources (OER) are, according to the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation “teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others. Open educational resources include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, tests, software, and any other tools, materials, or techniques used to support access to knowledge.” Many OER are licensed under the Creative Commons, which allows users to access, copy, and share the work (non-commercially, very often), and also may allow for some adaptation or remixing of the material.

Whether you’re looking for ways to tweak your syllabus, provide enriching one-day lessons, or jump start lesson planning of your own, OER could prove useful in your teaching this fall. CUNY Central’s Library Services maintains a guide on OER and also an OA/OER Toolkit. Included in the OER guide is a non-comprehensive list of OER that you could employ in your classrooms. Click through on the links below for some OER guide highlights for you to explore in greater depth.

OER Libraries and Databases

OER Commons

 

OER Commons: A library of digital OER with advanced search tools to find the appropriate resources by course subject, course level, resource type, etc. Follow OER Commons on Twitter.

 

 

CCCOERCommunity College Consortium for Open Educational Resources: CCCOER maintains a list of OER, with corresponding links to content. One CCCOER goal is to enlist community college professors to refine and expand the existing resources so that current and future community college students have free access to quality materials rather than having to pay for expensive proprietary textbooks and workbooks. Follow CCCOER on Twitter.

 

MERLOTMultimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching (MERLOT II): MERLOT is a project of the California State University system and its partners to provide high-quality OER to educators and students and to allow educators to freely share resources they have developed on their own. Follow MERLOT on Twitter.

A search for Spanish language resources on MERLOT returns nearly 500 different results for materials that can be freely used in classrooms now, including:

  • An oral recording and paleographic transcription of all five+ hours of the Cantar de mio Cid, intending to allow students of the epic poem to appreciate its oralidad.
  • “Mi vida loca”: A 22-episode BBC mystery web series set in Madrid to teach Spanish vocabulary and grammar to beginners.
  • Trabalenguas: A site with 145 tongue twisters for pronunciation and vocabulary practice.

 

 


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