24
Feb 16

Funding: Vera Institute Research Fellowships

The Early Research Initiative at the Graduate Center, CUNY

invites applications for two

CUNY Graduate Center – Vera Institute Research Fellowships

Fellowship amounts: $4,000

Deadline for applications: March 29, 2016

 

The information below was provided by the Provost’s Office:

The Early Research Initiative invites applications for two Vera Institute Research Fellowships.  These $4,000 fellowships will be offered to Graduate Center Ph.D. students from any program with primary research interests in criminal or immigration justice and the work of the Vera Institute. The primary responsibilities of the award winners will be to collaborate with researchers in one of Vera’s 5 centers or programs on research relating to a specific project, including but not limited to data collection, analysis, fieldwork, report writing, stakeholder engagement, and dissemination.

While Vera’s centers, programs, and demonstration projects span the criminal justice system, it is offering CUNY Fellows projects in select areas. Please see the attached list of potential projects below, and indicate in your application which project or projects are most relevant to your experience and interest.

Fellowship recipients will be required to be in residence for 120 hours over the summer of 2016 at the Vera Institute working for scheduled times from 9:30 to 4pm on Monday through Friday. In addition, recipients will be required to do a brief public presentation on their work and write a blog post about their experiences before the end of the Fall 2016 semester.

To apply please send a letter of interest describing your research interests and related experience with specific reference to one of the projects described below, a c.v., a current Graduate Center transcript (Students may submit the unofficial student copy that can be printed from banner), and a letter of support from your primary advisor.

Instructions for submitting your application:

1)     Please combine the above materials (except for the letter of recommendation) into a SINGLE file (saved as either as a pdf document or a word document).

Use the following format when naming your document: Last Name, First Name, Program

2)     Email your file directly to fellowshipapps@gc.cuny.edu

Please use your Graduate Center email address when sending the file.

Instructions for Faculty Recommenders

1) Prepare your reference letter as a regular word or pdf document.

2) Please use the following format when naming your document: Student Last Name, First Name

3) Email your file directly to fellowshipapps@gc.cuny.edu

 Application Deadline: March 29th, 2016

CUNY Graduate Center / Vera Institute of Justice PhD Student Fellowships

Available projects, Summer 2016

Aging and Infirm Prisoners in New York

Center on Sentencing and Corrections and Substance Use and Mental Health Program 

The New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (DOCCS) currently holds approximately 53,000 incarcerated individuals. Within this population, 17% are over the age of 50, and many have severe mobility impairments and/or have been diagnosed with one or more serious illness. Medical parole is one option for releasing the most medically costly prisoners. This project, in partnership with DOCCS, will assess practices and policies for medical parole and identify opportunities for improvement, develop community based placement opportunities, and enhance DOCCS capacity to use medical parole and provide implementation assistance. In addition, Vera will track released individuals’ quality of live post-release.

Incarceration Trends

Center on Sentencing and Corrections

The Incarceration Trends Project (ITP) seeks to advance research on the prevalence and impact of incarceration at the local-level. Vera’s ITP dataset merges 45 years of county-level inmate population data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) Census of Jails and Annual Survey of Jails and resident population demographic data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Currently, the dataset includes jail data for every one of the approximately 3,000 counties in the country and combined jail and prison data for all counties in New York and California. In 2016, Vera will incorporate data for the number of people in, and admissions to, prison by commitment county for all 50 states. For more information, see the ITP data tool at trends.vera.org and complete details on the ITP dataset in Incarceration Trends: Data and Methods for Historical Jail Populations in U.S. Counties, 1970-2014 (Kang-Brown, 2015). Vera is seeking opportunities to use this tool to answer important questions about the use of incarceration, and the Summer Fellow will have the chance to take part in discussions and help shape the future direction of the project and analyses.

New York Immigrant Family Unity Project

Center on Immigration and Justice

The Vera-administered New York Immigrant Family Unity Project (NYIFUP) is the first public defender program in the country for immigrants facing deportation. NYIFUP provides detained indigent immigrants facing deportation at New York’s Varick Street Immigration Court with free, high-quality legal representation. The project, which seeks to keep immigrants with their families and in their communities, will also serve detained New York City residents whose deportation cases are being heard in nearby New Jersey locations.

The project seeks to increase court effectiveness and decrease detention times for those it represents, thereby saving taxpayer dollars, while maximizing due process. By keeping families together, the project lowers the social and economic costs that would otherwise be incurred by the City and State of New York and New York employers. NYIFUP provides a replicable model for other jurisdictions around the country. NYIFUP is a collaborative of Vera, the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights, The Center for Popular Democracy, Make the Road New York, and the Immigration Justice Clinic of Cardozo Law School.

Quantitative skills are important for this work, but this project also provides an opportunity to gain qualitative research experience, particularly data cleaning and analysis for the report to the City Council. There will be a rich, primary data set of over 1200 cases currently being compiled by three legal service providers in New York that will be available for analysis starting in June or July 2016.  There also may be an opportunity to help conduct qualitative interviews with clients of the program. Some knowledge of immigration law and Spanish language ability preferred.

Justice AmeriCorps

Center on Immigration and Justice

The number of children crossing the border without a parent or legal guardian has increased ten-fold in recent years, starting from an annual average of 6,000-7,000 children.  The purpose of the justice AmeriCorps Program is to use the AmeriCorps service model to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of immigration court proceedings involving unaccompanied children. Immigration judges are able to conduct hearings more effectively when unaccompanied children are assisted by competent legal representatives. Vera’s Center on Immigration and Justice is conducting this study to provide performance measurement and evaluation services that will contribute to the efficiency and effectiveness of the jAC Legal Services for Unaccompanied Children Program. The Summer Fellow will be able to learn about the project and take part in the evaluation.


24
Feb 16

Funding: Morgan Library and Museum Archival Fellowships

The Early Research Initiative at the Graduate Center, CUNY

invites applications for two

2016 Morgan Library and Museum-CUNY Graduate Center Archival Fellowships

Fellowship amounts: $4,000

Deadline for applications: March 15, 2016

 

The information below was provided by the Provost’s Office:

The Early Research Initiative invites applications for two Morgan Library & Museum Graduate Archival Fellowships. These $4,000 fellowships will be offered to Graduate Center Ph.D. students from any program with primary research interests related to the collections at the Morgan Library & Museum. The primary responsibilities of the award winners will be to collaborate with curators and librarians from the Morgan in order to process uncatalogued collections, improve public access to documents and related materials, and to gain experience in creating and organizing collections.

 While the rich and diverse collections of the Morgan Library & Museum span the medieval period to the contemporary moment and embrace the global as well as the local, it is offering CUNY Fellows projects in select areas ranging from the Italian Renaissance to the photography of Peter Hujar. Please see the attached list of potential projects below; applications are welcomed for specific projects.

 Fellowship recipients will be required to be in residence for 120 hours over the summer of 2016 at the Morgan working for scheduled times from 9:30 to 4pm on Monday through Friday. In addition, recipients will be required to do a brief public presentation on their work and write a blog post about their experiences before the end of the Fall 2016 semester. Additional opportunities for social media contributions to the Morgan’s accounts are also possible.

To apply please send a letter of interest describing your research interests and related experience with specific reference to one of the projects described below, a c.v., a current Graduate Center transcript (students may submit the unofficial student copy that can be printed from banner), and a letter of support from your primary advisor.

Instructions for submitting your application:

1)     Please combine the above materials (except for the letter of recommendation) into a SINGLE file (either as a pdf document or a word document).

  • Use the following format when naming your document: Last Name, First Name, Program

2)     Email your file directly to fellowshipapps@gc.cuny.edu

  • Please use your Graduate Center email address when sending the file.

Instructions for Faculty Recommenders

1)     Prepare your reference letter as a regular word or pdf document.

2)     Please use the following format when naming your document:  Student Last Name, First Name

3)     Email your file directly to fellowshipapps@gc.cuny.edu

Application Deadline: March 15, 2016

CUNY Graduate Center / Morgan Library & Museum Graduate Center PhD Student Fellowships

Available projects, Summer 2016

Doc Humes Papers (Literary & Historical Manuscripts)

Harold L. “Doc” Humes was a pivotal figure in the budding counterculture of the 1950s. A novelist, filmmaker, inventor, and activist, Humes founded The Paris Review in 1953 together with Peter Matthiessen and George Plimpton. The ca. 14-cubic-foot collection of Humes’s papers consists of manuscripts, documents relating to various projects and patents, correspondence regarding The Paris Review, personal correspondence and family papers, clippings, photographs, and audio visual material. It has been inventoried and partially rehoused. This archival processing project would address the next stage of processing: physically reorganizing the collection; creating a finding aid; and inventorying photographs and media.

Paris Review Archive (Literary & Historical Manuscripts)

The 150+-cubic-foot collection consists of correspondence, typescripts, and galley proofs of several hundred writers; editorial, production, and business correspondence; and other records of the international literary journal from just before its founding in 1953 through 2003. The collection has been described at the box level, but only a portion of it has been fully processed. This archival processing project would continue the processing of the minimally-described parts of the collection.

Carter Burden Collection of American Literature (Literary & Historical Manuscripts)

In 2013, the Morgan received from the family of Carter Burden more than 400 manuscripts, typescripts, screenplays, and correspondence to add to that collection of twentieth century American literature. The collection includes authors such as Elizabeth Bishop, Ben Hecht, Sylvia Plath, John Steinbeck, Tennessee Williams, and others. This project would focus on researching and individually cataloging the works in this collection.

George Washington (Literary & Historical Manuscripts)

The Morgan has strong holdings in the letters of American presidents. This project would survey the holdings in a targeted section of the collection and ensure that the location of each item is correctly represented in the online catalog.

Artist letters from the Rosenberg Collection (Literary & Historical Manuscripts)

In 2013, the Morgan received approximately 300 artist letters as an accretion to the Rosenberg collection. The letters, in French, are from the personal papers and professional correspondence of Paul and Alexandre P. Rosenberg, leading art dealers of the late 19th and 20th centuries. The collection includes letters of Salvador Dali, Edgar Degas, Alberto Giacometti, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Gertrude Stein, and others. This project would focus on researching and individually cataloging the works in this collection, using a pre-existing finding aid as a guide.

Italian Renaissance letters from the White Collection (Literary & Historical Manuscripts)

The Morgan has strong holdings in letters of the Italian Renaissance. This project would individually catalog letters from the White Collection, which spans the 15th to the 17thcenturies, and includes letters of Francesco Filelfo, the Barzi family, the Borghese family, and others. Approximately fifty letters are addressed to Ludovico Maria Sforza (commonly called Ludovico il Moro, 1452-1508), the great patron of Leonardo da Vinci. The ideal candidate for this fellowship will have some previous experience or training in Italian paleography and with manuscripts of the period.

Peter Hujar (Photography)

Hujar was a leading figure in the group of artists, musicians, writers, and performers at the forefront of the cultural scene in downtown New York in the 1970s and early 1980s. This project would focus on enhancing the existing finding aid for the Peter Hujar Papers (Acc. #: 2013.108), with special attention to identifying correspondents, photographic subjects, and improving the description of the 5,700 contact sheets contained in the collection, which spans Hujar’s career from the 1950s until his death from AIDS in 1987.


13
Feb 16

CFP: Translation Theory Today

Translation Theory Today

An Interdisciplinary Conference on Critical Theory

Dates: May 5-6, 2016
Location: The Graduate Center, CUNY
Keynote Speakers: Homi K. Bhabha (Harvard University), Edwin Frank (The New York Review of Books Classics)
Keynote Roundtable on Practice: Barbara Epler (New Directions), Jonathan Galassi (Farrar, Straus, & Giroux),  and Jill Schoolman (Archipelago Books)
Deadline for Abstracts: March 1, 2016

The Critical Theory Certificate Program at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in conjunction with The Center for the Humanities presents the fifth annual interdisciplinary conference on Critical Theory to be held May 5th-6th, 2016.  This year’s conference will be devoted to the theory and practice of translation.

Literally meaning “carried across,” translation facilitates the movement of ideas among individuals, cultures languages, time periods, and geographic boundaries. Since antiquity, scholars have questioned translation’s ability to preserve meaning across languages and debated whether the successful translator should provide a word for word conversion of the original or adapt the source material to fit its new context and, in so doing, take on an authorial role. The globalization of the present era has highlighted how translation fosters communication while emphasizing cultural differences and disparities, simultaneously illuminating and distorting meaning. In the liminal space between the spoken and the unspeakable, translation serves as an adaptive tool that facilitates the development of new social memories and historical narratives. This conference seeks to employ Critical Theory to examine all aspects of translation—its history, evolution, practice, and effects on language, identity, culture, and society—in order to interrogate the functions of and standards for a successful translation. We welcome a wide range of disciplines and theoretical approaches, including literary theory, psychoanalysis, identity theory, semiotics, philosophy, social theory, cultural studies, postcolonialism, gender studies, and political theory. Some of the topics that this conference seeks to address include, but are not limited to:

  • Translation’s adaptation of the source material to fit new historical, social, and cultural contexts
  • The creative aspects of a translation, and its capacity to stand on its own artistic merits
  • The translator’s role as an author and translation’s fidelity (or lack thereof) to the original source material
  • The possibility of cultural translation
  • The relationship between translation and globalization
  • Translation as means of comprehending Self and Other
  • The particular characteristics of writers and translators in exile, immigrant, diaspora, and dissident communities
  • The evolution and history of translation, especially with respect to Antiquity and the Middle Ages
  • The psychological effects of translation, particularly with regard to identity politics
  • Translation and its relationships with etymology and philology (e.g. Turǧumān, dragoman, drogman, targum)
  • Translation as an ideological or political tool
  • Translation and memory
  • The function of translation in polyglot communities
  • Theoretical analyses of translations
  • Authors who translate and the inner translator in bilingual and trilingual authors
  • Technology’s effect on translation and the impact of internet translation communities
  • Translation as figure
  • Translation, imitation, and hybridity
  • The consequences of improper or mistranslation

Please submit a 300-word abstract to translationtheorytoday [at] gmail [dot] com by March 1st. Proposals should include the title of the paper, the presenter’s name, a 50-word bio including institutional and departmental affiliation, and any technology requests. We also welcome panel proposals of three to four papers.


13
Feb 16

CFP: Symposium on Language & the Sustainable Development Goals

A Symposium on Language and the Sustainable Development Goals

Organized by:
The Study Group on Language at the United Nations in cooperation with
The Centre for Research and Documentation on World Language Problems
and the Center for Applied Linguistics 

 

Date: Thursday, April 21, 2016.  1:00-5:00pm
Location: Church Center, 777 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017
Deadline for proposals: February 29, 2016.

The following information was provided by symposium organizers. Find our more on their website: www.languageandtheun.org

Proposals for short 10- or 20-minute presentations or panel discussions should focus on the following themes:

  • Language & Poverty
  • Language & Healthcare
  • Language, Education & Gender
  • Language, Infrastructure & Inclusivity
  • Language, Sustainability & Environment
  • Language & Global Partnerships

For more information and examples of more specific prompts, contact sustainabilityandlanguage [at] gmail [dot] com.

Sustainable Development Goals:

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals approved by the UN General Assembly (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/) for the period 2015-2030 replace the eight Millennium Development Goals that covered the period 2000-2015. They aim to engage not only governments, but “all people, everywhere,” at all levels of civil society. Carrying them out will require active, two-way, democratic communication, in a multiplicity of languages. Furthermore, several of the Goals imply direct attention to issues of language. Study and research on language in relation to economic and social development is a well-established field that does not always receive the attention it merits. What does this field have to contribute to the realization of the SDGs? What linguistic obstacles stand in the way of their successful realization.

Submissions:

If you are interested in participating, submit a one paragraph description of your planned 10- or 20-minute presentation or panel discussion on the topic to sustainabilityandlanguage@gmail.com by February 29. Once accepted, a more detailed description of the presentation or panel should be sent by March 31.

Specific prompts include but are not limited to:

Language & Poverty

  • How does language factor in poverty, socioeconomic identity, and economic mobility?
  • What communicative issues have arisen in the implementation of sustainable and healthy food systems, including production, consumption, and security?
  • How can language policy aid in the reduction of inequality, especially as it relates to the treatment of linguistic minorities?

Language & Healthcare

  • What initiatives have been successful or not so successful in administering healthcare to individuals who do not speak the local language in cities, refugee camps, and elsewhere?

Language, Education & Gender

  • What role do monoglot ideologies play in preventing access to education, especially for adult learners? How can larger scale education on the realities of multilingualism impact adults who are isolated or dependant on younger family members for access to resources?
  • Do access to language education and sociolinguistic issues involving home-language usage disproportionately affect women and girls? If so, how do these issues prevent gender equality?
  • In what ways do language-of-instruction and language-education policies affect career-readiness?

Language, Infrastructure & Inclusivity

  • How does media discourse impact community organizing attempts by underserved communities (often tied to racialization), as in the case of Flint?
  • How can processes of industrialization and infrastructure-building leverage linguistic and cultural heterogeneity as an asset to promote a more inclusive and innovative future?
  • In order to make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable, what linguistic infrastructure must be available to residents so that all, including those who only speak minority languages, may participate in helping achieve those goals?

Language, Sustainability & Environment

  • When educating consumers, manufacturers and retailers about sustainable consumption and production patterns, what cultural and linguistic hurdles will be faced? How might these hurdles affect legislation and enforcement of sustainability issues.
  • Residents of areas under the jurisdiction of environmental legislation sometimes feel an infringement on their personal freedoms, often leading to costly and ineffective top-down enforcement protocols. Could a more inclusive atmosphere of communication lead to better local enforcement?

Language & Global Partnerships

  • The implementation of a global partnership for sustainable development requires in-depth two-way communications, many times through translation. How have one-way translation methods for the dissemination of policy failed to adequately apply global policy to local needs.

11
Feb 16

Funding: CUNY Humanities Teaching and Learning Alliance

In the fall of 2015, the Graduate Center was awarded a $3.15 million grant from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation to support a new four-year initiative, The CUNY Humanities Teaching and Learning Alliance (HTLA). HTLA will place fellows from the Graduate Center in LaGuardia Community College classrooms, partnering with master faculty there.

And the really good news? Latin American literature and Spanish Composition courses do form a large part of the need to be filled by HTLA fellows!

More information about HTLA can be found here.

Two-year fellowships of $25,000 per year are available to nine Graduate Center students. Other eligibility notes:

  • Students must be entering years 2-5 of their graduate study during the 2016-2017 school year.
  • The fellowships are available to students in the social sciences and the humanities.
  • Students with DACA status are eligible to apply.

Read more fellowship requirements and apply! The deadline for applications is February 29, 2016. 

Any questions about the fellowships should be directed to the Teaching and Learning Center Forum on the Commons. You must be a member of the TLC Commons group to post a topic on the Forum.


09
Feb 16

CFP: LL Journal’s Vol. 11, No. 1

Call for Papers: LL Journal’s Volume 11, Number 1

Deadline for submission: March 13, 2016

The information below was provided by the editorial team of the LL Journal, a publication of the students of the Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages PhD program at the Graduate Center, CUNY. Find out more about the LL Journal and browse their most recent issue (Vol. 10, No. 1) and archives on their Commons site.

LL Journal CFP Spring 2016

LL Journal los invita a colaborar en su nuevo número (mayo 2016). Requerimos artículos sobre literatura, estudios culturales y de género, lingüística aplicada, lingüística teórica y sociolingüística, que se encuentren en estrecha relación con los mundos hispanos y luso- brasileños. Este número contará con una sección especial (Boundaries) en torno a las nociones de margen, liminalidad, periferia y descentramiento. Los animamos a que envíen artículos vinculados a esta línea de reflexión, pero recordamos que la temática de la revista es siempre abierta.

Todos los trabajos deberán respetar las orientaciones propuestas en las Directrices para autores y se enviarán al siguiente correo electrónico: lljournal [dot] cuny [at] gmail [dot] com.

Para mantener el anonimato durante el proceso de selección, se requiere indicar los datos personales en el cuerpo del correo electrónico y no en el archivo adjunto que contiene el artículo. Los autores seleccionados serán notificados en un plazo no mayor a dos meses.

LL Journal es una publicación coordinada por las y los estudiantes del Programa Doctoral de Lenguas y Literaturas Hispánicas y Luso-Brasileñas. CUNY, The Graduate Center, Nueva York.

 


05
Feb 16

CFP: Realisms: Politics, Art, and Visual Culture in the Americas

Realisms: Politics, Art, and Visual Culture in the Americas

Symposium for Emerging Scholars at

The Institute of Fine Arts and the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art

Date: April 30, 2016
Keynote lecturer: José Luis Falconi
Deadline: February 15​​, 2016 2016

The call for papers that follows has been provided by the symposium organizing committee. Read the full call for papers and find out more about ISLAA on their site. 

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Institute of Fine Arts and the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art are pleased to announce the inaugural IFA–ISLAA Symposium for emerging scholars, “Realisms: Politics, Art, and Visual Culture in the Americas.” The symposium will take place on April 30, 2016 with a keynote lecture by José Luis Falconi.

In the past few years alone, there has been a proliferation of art initiatives that have attempted to synthesize and analyze Latin American art. While such endeavors have been instrumental in raising the profile of this field, they inherently risk creating an idealized history of visual culture, in which the realities of art-making in the Americas recede or are otherwise mystified. Rather than attempting to understand American visualities through received stylistic categories (e.g. geometric abstraction, figuration, conceptualism), an approach that engages more directly with aesthetic and social realities may begin to expand our understandings.

This conference considers “realism” in the Americas not as a stylistic mode pertaining to figuration, mimesis, or authenticity, but rather as a strategy for critically addressing social, political, and economic conditions. Departing from Jacques Rancière’s proposition that “an image is an element in a system that creates a certain sense of reality,” we aim to examine how visual interventions might “construct different realities…different spatiotemporal systems, different communities of words and things, forms, and meanings.”1 From the struggles for independence circa 1800 to contemporary actions addressing political violence and exclusionary immigration policies, the problem of reality has proven central to representations of life across the hemisphere. At a moment in which “global art history” has gained increasing prominence, and in which Latin American art history has moved from the marginal to the canonical, how can we address the specificities of lived experience, both local and hemispheric, while also acknowledging broader connections?

Current graduate students, recent graduates, and emerging scholars are invited to apply. Applicants from fields outside the realm of art history, but grounded in visual material, are highly encouraged (e.g. Cinema and Media Studies, Latin American and Latina/o studies, Visual Culture).

Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

• Art and activism, human rights

• Decolonization, immigration, asylum

• Subjectivity, affect, intersectionality

• Geographic, social, and political topographies

• Reenactment and the place of memory

• Labor, natural resources, global markets

• Technology, communication, surveillance

• Housing, monuments, space

The conference will serve as the principal event of the Latin American Forum for Spring 2016. This ongoing forum—generously funded by the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) and coordinated by Professor Edward J. Sullivan—invites distinguished visiting lecturers to the IFA to foster greater understanding and recognition of Latin American art around the world.

To apply, please submit an abstract of up to 300 words to symposium@islaa.org by Monday, February 15, 2016. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance by Monday, February 29, 2016. Presentations will be limited to 20 minutes, with additional time for discussion. In your application, please indicate your current institutional affiliation and from where you will be traveling. Limited funding will be available to assist with travel expenses.

The conference is organized by current IFA PhD candidates in modern and contemporary Latin American art history: Sean Nesselrode Moncada, Juanita Solano, Susanna Temkin, Lizzie Frasco, Blanca Serrano Ortiz, Priscilla Bolanos Salas, Emily Lyver, Brian Bentley, and Madeline Murphy Turner. For further information or with any questions, please contact symposium@islaa.org.


29
Jan 16

Funding: Provost’s Pre-Dissertation Research Fellowship

Provost’s Pre-Dissertation Research Fellowship

Deadline for Applications: Monday, February, 29, 2016, 2:00 pm

The Provost’s Office is offering multiple $4,000 summer fellowships for doctoral students with Level II status as well as Level III students who have not submitted a prospectus to their program. The fellowships are available to students in the humanities and social sciences.

Please read the following information from the Provost’s Office about the fellowships and application process. Cover letter forms for the application were emailed to students at their @gradcenter.cuny.edu addresses.

 

This fellowship program has two objectives:

·       To allow students to conduct pre-dissertation research and training following completion of the first exam.

·       To support the development of a dissertation research proposal suitable for submission to an external funding agency.

This program seeks to facilitate the transition from coursework to advanced individualized research.  Early research awards allow students to strengthen their proposals by:

·       Refining their research topic into a well-defined research problem;

·       Determining appropriate research design, methods, research locale(s), and language(s);

·       Assessing project feasibility and determining necessary affiliations and approvals.

The successful applicant will address how their proposed summer research will lead to an improved proposal with regard to the above categories. Recipients will undertake such activities as (but not limited to): initial field work, preliminary data collection, travel related to research (i.e. preliminary visits to archives, special collections, museums, and/or historic sites), supplementary training in methods or techniques, or specialized language instruction.  This program does not support conference attendance.

Eligibility

·       Students must be level II, exceptions will be made for students in programs where a formal dissertation prospectus/proposal is not submitted for approval until after advancing to level III. Such level III students will only be eligible if they have not officially submitted a prospectus/proposal to their program.

·       Applicants must conduct at least four weeks of summer research away from their home institutions.

N.B.. Students who have already received a Dissertation Fellowship from the Provost’s Office are ineligible to receive these awards. 

 

Each application must include the following:  

1)     Cover Sheet [emailed to students at their @gradcenter.cuny.edu addresses].

2)     Research Proposal that includes the following sections:

a.      Describe what you currently expect will be the topic, research question(s), supportive literature, methods of investigation, approach to data analysis, and theoretical contribution of your proposed dissertation project (up to 1,200 words).

b.     List up to 20 research publications that have most significantly informed the formulation of your research topic, questions, theories, and methods.

c.      What are your plans for summer research? (up to 500 words) Please include: a justification for your choice or research site(s) and/or sources of data and information; a brief description of your anticipated approaches to investigation; a timeline; and any local professional contacts you might have made.

d.     Describe how you think this summer research will assist you in developing your dissertation proposal and preparing for long term dissertation research. (up to 250 words)

Note: if you have previously conducted exploratory research at any of your proposed research site(s) or on a related topic, please explain how the additional research proposed will enable you to build upon your past experience.

3)     Two-page curriculum vitae.

4)     Current Graduate Center transcript.  (Students may submit the unofficial student copy that can be printed from banner.)

5)     One letter of reference to be submitted electronically by your adviser or faculty mentor (see instructions below).

Recipients of these fellowships must agree to the following conditions as part of their acceptance of the award:

1)     Attend a one-hour proposal writing workshop in May 2016.

2)     Write a one-page summary of their summer research work (due by 21 August 2016).

3)     Provide a 7-10 minute public presentation of their work at a doctoral student research conference to be held at the Graduate Center in September 2016.

4)     Attend a grant writing workshop at the Graduate Center in the 2016-2017 academic year designed to assist you in applying for future grants and fellowships (multiple sessions of the workshop will be held in order to accommodate potential scheduling conflicts).

5)     Agree to have some version of their summer work potentially featured on a Student Research Collaborative webpage currently under construction by the Early Research Initiative Research Collaborative.

Instructions for submitting your application:

1)     Combine your cover sheet, research proposal, curriculum vitae, and transcript into a SINGLE file (either as a pdf document or a word document).

  • Use the following format when naming your document: Last Name, First Name, Program

2)     Email the file as an email attachment to fellowshipapps[at] gc [dot] cuny [dot] edu

Instructions for Faculty Recommenders

1)     Prepare your reference letter as a regular word or pdf document.

  • Please use the following format when naming your document: Student Last Name, First Name

2)     Email the file as an email attachment to fellowshipapps [at] gc [dot] cuny [dot] edu

 

 If you have questions, please contact Rachel Sponzo at rsponzo [at] gc [dot] cuny [dot] edu, or 212-817-7282.


28
Jan 16

Funding: University of Florida Library Travel Research Grants

The University of Florida Latin American and Caribbean collection is offering Library Travel Research Grants of up to $1000 through the University of Florida Center for Latin American Studies. These Grants will be used for travel and research in the spring and summer of 2016.

Deadline for applications: February 19, 2016.

The information that follows is from the University of Florida Center for Latin American Studies. For more information about the grants and the application procedure, visit their website.

The UF Latin American and Caribbean Collection is pleased to announce that the University of Florida Center for Latin American Studies is again sponsoring Library Travel Research Grants for Spring & Summer 2016.

The purpose of the travel grants is to enable faculty researchers from other U.S. colleges and universities to use the extensive resources of the Latin American and Caribbean Collection in the University of Florida Libraries, thereby enhancing its value as a national resource. The grants are funded by a Title VI National Resource Center grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

Seven or more travel grants of up to $1000 each will be made to cover travel and lodging expenses. Grantees are expected to remain in Gainesville for at least one week and, following their stay, submit a brief (2-3 pp.) report on how their work at UF Libraries enriched their research project and offer suggestions for possible improvements of the Latin American and Caribbean Collection.

Applicants must be US citizens or permanent residents.

Application Deadline
We will be accepting applications for Library Travel Grants for Spring & Summer 2016 until February 19, 2016. All travel must be completed by July 30, 2016.

Application Procedure
All applications must be filed electronically.

To apply for a Library Travel Grant, please send a letter of intent, a brief library research proposal, a travel budget, and a CV to:

Ms. Nathalia Ochoa, Program Coordinator
Center for Latin American Studies
Telephone: 352-273-4715
E-mail: nochoa [at] latam [dot] ufl [dot] edu


27
Jan 16

Funding: 2016-2017 Public Humanities Fellowship

2016-2017 Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellowship

Application Deadline: Friday, February 12, 2016

The Center for the Humanities at The Graduate Center and the New York Council for the Humanities announce the call for applicants for the 2016-2017 Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellowship. The fellowship awards are $8,000, plus $500 for research and travel. Fellows are also eligible to receive funds to support public programming they develop during the year.

Please review the information below from the Center for the Humanities about the fellowship and the application process. More information can be found on their website.

 

The Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellowship was developed by the New York Council for the Humanities in partnership with seven New York research universities to bring humanities scholarship into the public realm, encourage emerging humanities scholars to conceive of their work in relation to the public sphere, develop scholars’ skills for doing public work, and strengthen the public humanities community in New York State. The year-long Fellowship will involve a combination of training in the methods and approaches of public scholarship and work by the Fellow to explore the public dimensions of their own scholarship in partnership with a community organization.

The skills and experiences afforded by the Fellowship are intended to serve scholars who have a record of working with the public as well as those who are starting to explore the public humanities. It is equally valuable for scholars who plan to pursue careers within the academy and those who plan to pursue other career paths.

FELLOWSHIP REQUIREMENTS:

  • The Fellow is required to attend a two-day orientation run by the New York Council for the Humanities at their New York City office on Monday, August 22 and Tuesday, August 23, 2016.
  • During the Fellowship year, the Fellow will develop a plan to implement a public humanities project and identify community partners for that project.
  • The Fellow will participate in webinars and workshops throughout the Fellowship year and attend a final meeting of the Fellows in June 2017.
  • The Fellow will present the outcomes of their research and public work to the university community in coordination with The Center for the Humanities at The Graduate Center and submit a final report to the New York Council for the Humanities.
  • During the course of the Fellowship, Fellows will have the opportunity to participate in events sponsored by the New York Council for the Humanities. Fellows are also eligible for project funds from the Council to support public programs developed during the course of their Fellowship.  Throughout the Fellowship, Fellows are encouraged to work collaboratively with the Council to identify community partners, explore public humanities methods and programs, and share findings as their research progresses.  The Graduate Center Fellows will be part of a cohort from these six other New York universities: Columbia University, Cornell University, New York University, SUNY Buffalo, SUNY Stony Brook, and Syracuse University.
 
ELIGIBILITY:Applicants must be residents of New York State and enrolled as a graduate student in a humanities discipline, broadly defined, at one of these seven universities:  The City University of New York Graduate Center, Columbia University, Cornell University, New York University, SUNY Buffalo, SUNY Stony Brook, or Syracuse University. Must be second-year PhD candidate or above.
 
DURATION & STIPEND: Duration of the Fellowship is August 2016 to June 2017, including mandatory attendance at a two-day orientation on August 22-23, 2016 in New York City. The Fellowship stipend is $8,000, plus a $500 travel and research stipend. The Fellowship is supported by grants from the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
 
TO APPLY: Interested applicants should submit an online application, including a resume/CV and two references, by Friday, February 12, 2016.  The link to the application is here: Public Humanities Fellowship Application
Applicants will be notified of final decisions by Friday, April 8, 2016.
 
CONTACT: New York Council for the Humanities Program Officer Adam Capitanio (212-233-1131 / acapitanio [at] nyhumanities [dot] org)
 
ABOUT THE CENTER FOR THE HUMANITIES The Center for the Humanities encourages collaborative and creative work in the humanities at CUNY and across the city through seminars, publications, and public events. Free and open to the public, our programs aim to inspire sustained, engaged conversation and to forge an open and diverse intellectual community.
 
ABOUT THE NEW YORK COUNCIL FOR THE HUMANITIES: The mission of the New York Council for the Humanities is to help all New Yorkers become thoughtful participants in our communities by promoting critical inquiry, cultural understanding, and civic engagement. Founded in 1975, the New York Council for the Humanities is the sole statewide proponent of public access to the humanities. The Council is a private 501(c)3 that receives Federal, State, and private funding. 

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