04
Nov 16

Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricas: Obejas & Luiselli

Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricas
Hablan las narradoras

Achy Obejas & Valeria Luiselli

In the second of this two-part series organized by students of the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages, Achy Obejas and Valeria Luiselli will be in conversation with each other and with the public about such possible topics as the experience of translation as a cultural exchange in New York, the relation between English and Spanish in both their academic and creative writing careers, the importance of emerging LGBTIQ voices in fiction, the immigrant women’s experience in the U.S., and issues related to women writer’s rights.

This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.

Many thanks to the event’s principal organizers: Elena Chávez Goycochea, Mariana Romo-Carmona, and Nan Zheng

And also to the event’s co-sponsors:
The PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages
The students of the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages
The Doctoral Students’ Council
The Classical and Modern Languages department at City College, CUNY
The Feminist Press
The Mexican Cultural Institute of New York
The Center for the Study of Women & Society


21
Oct 16

GC: Gregory Rabassa (1922-2016), A Celebration

Dr. Gregory Rabassa, a world-renowned translator and Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Queens College and the Graduate Center, passed away on June 16th, 2016. Join the Center for the Humanities and the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages as we celebrate Professor Rabassa’s life and work with readings and a discussion on October 21, 2016.

This event is free and open to the public.

The following information has been provided by the Center for the Humanities. Read more about the event and the participants here.

Gregory Rabassa (1922-2016), A Celebration

Reading and Conversation

About the event

professor-rabassaFew figures have marked the English-language literature of our time as deeply as did Gregory Rabassa. Translator of Julio Cortázar’s Hopscotch (1966), Clarice Lispector’s The Apple in the Dark (1967), Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude (1970),  Mario Vargas Llosa’s Conversation in the Cathedral (1974), Luis Rafael Sánchez’s Macho Camacho’s Beat (1980), Luisa Valenzuela’s The Lizard’s Tail (1983), José Lezama Lima’s Paradiso (2005), and more than fifty other works from Spanish and Portuguese—and himself the author of a number of books, including his prize-winning memoir If This Be Treason (2005)— Rabassa was a beloved professor and colleague at City University of New York, where he taught at the Graduate Center and Queens College for more than forty years.

Among the numerous honors Rabassa received were the National Book Award in Translation (1967), the Gregory Kolovakos Award for career achievement from PEN American Center (2001), the National Medal of Arts from the National Endowment for the Arts (2006), and the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for the Art of the Memoir (2006). “We Spanish-language writers, especially of my generation, owe him enormous gratitude for the way he helped us plant roots in the English-speaking world,” wrote Mario Vargas Llosa earlier this year.

Speakers include Edith Grossman, Peter ConstantineEarl Fitz, Ezra FitzEsther AllenIlan StavansMauricio FontElizabeth LoweHarry MoralesDaniel ShapiroNora GlickmanDeclan Spring, Ammiel AlcalayStanley BarkanCatarina CordeiroDavid Draper Clark, and Rabassa’s daughters Clara Rabassa and Kate Rabassa Wallen.

A reception will follow.

This event is co-sponsored by:
The Ph.D. Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages, the Bildner Center for Western Hemisphere Studies, the Translation Mellon Seminar on Public Engagement and Collaborative Research, at the Graduate Center, CUNY; the MFA in Creative Writing and Translation, the Department of Comparative Literature, and the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, Queens College, CUNY;  PEN America; Words Without Borders; Review: Literature and Arts of the Americas (published by Routledge in association with The City College of New York, CUNY); The Bridge Literary Translation Series; the Instituto Cervantes of New York; and Julianne and Earl E. Fitz.


30
Sep 16

HLBLL: Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricas

Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricas
Hablan las narradoras

Sylvia Molloy & Lina Meruane

In the first of this two-part series organized by students of the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages, Sylvia Molloy and Lina Meruane will be in conversation with each other and with the public about such possible topics as the experience of translation as a cultural exchange in New York, the relation between English and Spanish in both their academic and creative writing careers, the importance of emerging LGBTIQ voices in fiction, the immigrant women’s experience in the U.S., and issues related to women writer’s rights.

This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.

Many thanks to the event’s principal organizers: Elena Chávez Goycochea, Mariana Romo-Carmona, and Nan Zheng

And also to the event’s co-sponsors:
The PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages
The students of the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages
The Doctoral Students’ Council
The Classical and Modern Languages department at City College, CUNY
The Feminist Press
The Mexican Cultural Institute of New York
The Center for the Study of Women & Society


24
Sep 16

Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricas

In the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso Brazilian Literatures and Languages at the Graduate Center, our intellectual community is enhanced by the academic events organized by our students. Besides the annual graduate student conference (coming up on its 22nd year!), each year HLBLL students have also organized readings, lectures, screenings, and discussions on a wide variety of topics and with exciting guests.

One such event is the upcoming two-part series, Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricas: Hablan las narradoras, which invites four distinguished women writers–Sylvia Molloy, Lina Meruane, Achy Obejas, and Valeria Luiselli–to enter into conversation with each other and the public about such possible topics as the experience of translation as a cultural exchange in New York, the relation between English and Spanish in both their academic and creative writing careers, the importance of emerging LGBTIQ voices in fiction, the immigrant women’s experience in the U.S., and issues related to women writer’s rights. The series was organized by HLBLL students Elena Chávez Goycochea, Mariana Romo-Carmona, and Nan Zheng.

Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricas: Hablan las narradoras

Escritoras de las Latin-a-méricasFriday, September 30: A conversation with Sylvia Molloy y Lina Meruane

Friday, November 4: A conversation with Achy Obejas & Valeria Luiselli

 

Both conversations are free, open to the public, and will take place starting at 6:30pm in room 4116 at the Graduate Center, CUNY. A reception will follow the conversation on each night.

Thanks to our fantastic student organizers, and also to the event’s co-sponsors:
The PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages
The students of the PhD Program in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages
The Doctoral Students’ Council
The Classical and Modern Languages department at City College, CUNY
The Feminist Press
The Mexican Cultural Institute of New York
The Center for the Study of Women & Society


13
Feb 16

CFP: Translation Theory Today

Translation Theory Today

An Interdisciplinary Conference on Critical Theory

Dates: May 5-6, 2016
Location: The Graduate Center, CUNY
Keynote Speakers: Homi K. Bhabha (Harvard University), Edwin Frank (The New York Review of Books Classics)
Keynote Roundtable on Practice: Barbara Epler (New Directions), Jonathan Galassi (Farrar, Straus, & Giroux),  and Jill Schoolman (Archipelago Books)
Deadline for Abstracts: March 1, 2016

The Critical Theory Certificate Program at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in conjunction with The Center for the Humanities presents the fifth annual interdisciplinary conference on Critical Theory to be held May 5th-6th, 2016.  This year’s conference will be devoted to the theory and practice of translation.

Literally meaning “carried across,” translation facilitates the movement of ideas among individuals, cultures languages, time periods, and geographic boundaries. Since antiquity, scholars have questioned translation’s ability to preserve meaning across languages and debated whether the successful translator should provide a word for word conversion of the original or adapt the source material to fit its new context and, in so doing, take on an authorial role. The globalization of the present era has highlighted how translation fosters communication while emphasizing cultural differences and disparities, simultaneously illuminating and distorting meaning. In the liminal space between the spoken and the unspeakable, translation serves as an adaptive tool that facilitates the development of new social memories and historical narratives. This conference seeks to employ Critical Theory to examine all aspects of translation—its history, evolution, practice, and effects on language, identity, culture, and society—in order to interrogate the functions of and standards for a successful translation. We welcome a wide range of disciplines and theoretical approaches, including literary theory, psychoanalysis, identity theory, semiotics, philosophy, social theory, cultural studies, postcolonialism, gender studies, and political theory. Some of the topics that this conference seeks to address include, but are not limited to:

  • Translation’s adaptation of the source material to fit new historical, social, and cultural contexts
  • The creative aspects of a translation, and its capacity to stand on its own artistic merits
  • The translator’s role as an author and translation’s fidelity (or lack thereof) to the original source material
  • The possibility of cultural translation
  • The relationship between translation and globalization
  • Translation as means of comprehending Self and Other
  • The particular characteristics of writers and translators in exile, immigrant, diaspora, and dissident communities
  • The evolution and history of translation, especially with respect to Antiquity and the Middle Ages
  • The psychological effects of translation, particularly with regard to identity politics
  • Translation and its relationships with etymology and philology (e.g. Turǧumān, dragoman, drogman, targum)
  • Translation as an ideological or political tool
  • Translation and memory
  • The function of translation in polyglot communities
  • Theoretical analyses of translations
  • Authors who translate and the inner translator in bilingual and trilingual authors
  • Technology’s effect on translation and the impact of internet translation communities
  • Translation as figure
  • Translation, imitation, and hybridity
  • The consequences of improper or mistranslation

Please submit a 300-word abstract to translationtheorytoday [at] gmail [dot] com by March 1st. Proposals should include the title of the paper, the presenter’s name, a 50-word bio including institutional and departmental affiliation, and any technology requests. We also welcome panel proposals of three to four papers.


09
Nov 15

HLBLL: “Automirada / Self-View”

“Automirada / Self-View: Point of Arrival, Point of Departure in Artistic Creation”

Basque author Miren Agur Meabe and literary translator Amaia Gabantxo will talk about writing and translating Meabe’s latest work, Kristalezko Begi Bat / A Glass Eye, and discuss the issues surrounding the smaller literatures, the idea of the literary self-portrait and the place of music in language.

Miren Agur Meabe received the Critics’ Award in 2001 and 2011 for her poem collections Azalaren kodea (The Code of the Skin) and Bitsa eskuetan (Spume), and the Euskadi Award on three occasions for three of her books for young adults. Mila magnolia-lore, one of her books for children, was included in the IBBY Honours List 2012. She has performed and lectured in universities in Europe and the US, and participated in literary festivals all over the world – such as Dublin, Vjlenca, Edinburgh, Vienna, Frankfurt, Pau, Verines and Cordoba.

automirada 1

Amaia Gabantxo is a writer, a flamenco singer and literary translator specialized in Basque literature. She has translated works by every canonical Basque author, and published and performed on both sides of the Atlantic. At present, she is developing two hybrid literary/musical/performance art projects in Chicago. Palo a Palo, which combines flamenco and Butoh and Soniché, which fuses flamenco with classical music.

automirada 2


29
Oct 15

HLBLL: Young Spanish Poets

Young Spanish Poets

Conversación con Elena Medel y Alberto Acerete

Los dos escritores españoles nos hablarán sobre literatura, poesía joven en español, edición y traducción.

Elena Medel

Medel photo 

La obra poética de Elena Medel (Córdoba, 1985) ha sido reunida en el libro Un día negro en una casa de mentira (1998-2014) (Visor, 2015). Parcialmente traducida a numerosas lenguas, presenta ahora en Estados Unidos My First Bikini (trad. Lizzie Davies, Jai-Alai Books, 2015). De su trabajo como crítica literaria destaca El mundo mago. Cómo vivir con Antonio Machado (Ariel, 2015). Fundó su propia editorial de poesía, La Bella Varsovia, que tiende puentes transatlánticos con antologías como Los reyes subterráneos. Veinte poetas jóvenes de México (2015).

 

Alberto Acerete

Acerete Photo

Alberto Acerete (Zaragoza, 1987) es autor de El universo femenino del esperma (Aqua, 2008), El último verano (2010), Cartas de la guerra (2014) y Yo quiero bailar (La Bella Varsovia, 2015). Ha sido incluido en antologías como Tenían veinte años y estaban locos, editado por Luna Miguel (La Bella Varsovia, 2011).

 

Presenta Almudena Vidorreta (The Graduate Center, CUNY)

This event is free and open to the public


01
May 15

NYC: Translation in Transition Conference (Barnard College)

Translation in Transition

Barnard College, New York City, May 1-2, 2015

From the conference organizers:

How can we consolidate the gains made by Translation Studies over the last quarter century? What are the future coordinates of a field that is always – and perhaps should remain – in transition?

Translation Studies emerged as an academic discipline within the last thirty years, and the word ‘translation’ itself is often invoked when we celebrate the productivity of intellectual exchange.  Yet despite translation’s growing visibility as a metaphor for such exchange, and indeed as a  vehicle for it, translation’s place in the university remains in flux. This conference seeks to take the pulse of current research in Translation Studies and to map emerging and innovative approaches in the field. Our aim is not merely to examine the role of translation in academic settings; it is also to explore the relationships universities might foster with other sites where translation is at work.

Conference Schedule

Friday, May 1 – Please note new location: Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd floor, Barnard Hall (Campus Map)

2:00-4:00pm Panel: Frontiers and Futures of Translation: The Machine Age, the Age of the Digital Humanities

John Cayley (Brown University):
“The Translation of Literary Process”

Miguel A. Jiménez-Crespo (Rutgers University):
“Translated Texts in Digital Spaces: Collaborative Translation and the Challenges to Translation Theory”

Audrey Lorberfeld (University of Washington):
“Are You My Mother? An Exploration of Bibliographic Relationships of Translated Documents”

Mairi McLaughlin (University of California – Berkeley):
“The History of News Translation and its Place in our Discipline”

Moderated by Peter Connor (Barnard College)

4:00-4:30pm Coffee
4:30-6:30pm Panel: Sites, Nodes, Networks, and Habitats of Translation

Michelle Woods (State University of New York – New Paltz):
“Archiving Agency: the Materiality of the Translation Biblio-System”

Ahmad Ayyad (Al-Quds University):
“Translation and Political Marketing: Selling the Geneva Accord to the Palestinians and Israelis”

Janet Hendrickson (Cornell University):
“To Show the Truth by Allowing it to be Seen Hiding: the Functions of Lexical Excess in Anne Carson’s Nox

Corine Tatchiris (University of Massachusetts – Amherst):
“Branding World Literature: Translation at the Intersection of the Market and Academia”

Moderated by Brian O’Keeffe (Barnard College)

Saturday, May 2 – James Room, 4th floor, Barnard Hall (Campus Map)

10:00am-12:00pm Panel: Figures and Fables of the Translator

Bahareh Gharehgozlou (Kent State University):
“Translation Criticism: English Translation of The Shahnameh by Dick Davis”

Adriana Vega Mackler (University of Connecticut):
“Vistas of the Present: Translation and Representation in Salvador Benesdra and Rodolfo Rabanal”

Meg Matich (Columbia University):
Iceland: Rewriting Notions of Ice and Fire through Poetry Translation”

Marko Miletich (University of Texas – Arlington):
Dragomans Gaining Footing: Translators as Usurpers in Two stories by Rodolfo Walsh and Moacyr Scliar”

Moderated by Heather Cleary (Whitman College)

12:00-1:00pm Break
1:15-3:15pm Panel: Topoi: The “Otherwheres” of Translation

Brian James Baer (Kent State University):
“Translation and the Un-making of Literary Studies”

Nimrod Reitman (New York University):
“A Diva on Mute: Pasolini’s Medea

Jamille Pinheiro Dias (Stanford University/University of São Paulo):
“Utopias and Dystopias of Translation in the Ontological Turn: Implications of the Method of Controlled Equivocation”

Jenine Abboushi (Lebanese American University):
“The Chosen Language: West Asia’s New Non-native Productions”

Moderated by Bret Maney (University of Pennsylvania)

3:15-3:45pm Coffee
3:45-5:45pm Panel: Generation, Alteration, Translation

Carolyn Shread (Mount Holyoke College):
“Translation: Epigenesis of the Text”

James Petterson (Wellesley College):
“Emmanuel Hocquard: ‘Taches Blanches’ in Translation”

Geoffrey Bennington (Emory University):
“The Angel and the Beast”

Moderated by Nimrod Reitman (New York University)

5:45-6:00pm Coffee
6:00-7:00pm Round-table Topic: “Teaching Translation

Susan Bernofsky (Columbia University)
Peter Connor (Barnard College)
Marguerite Feitlowitz (Bennington College)

7:00-7:15pm Closing Remarks
Peter Connor (Barnard College)

 


21
Nov 14

HLBLL: “Sin Macondo, sin futuro, sin política: las antologías de narrativa latinoamericana contemporánea en traducción”

The Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages program presents:

“Sin Macondo, sin futuro, sin política: las antologías de narrativa latinoamericana contemporánea en traducción”

A talk by Professor Sarah Pollack (College of Staten Island, CUNY Graduate Center)

This event is free and open to the public.


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